Ratzlaff was referring to an atmospheric optical phenomenon that appears as reddish and green light in the sky. The name “Steve” is a nod to the 2006 animated film “Over the Hedge,” in which its characters chose “Steve” as a benign name for something unknown. Late at night on July 25, 2016, a thin river of purple light slashed through the skies of northern Canada in an arc that seemed to stretch hundreds of miles into space. For other uses, see, "Introducing Steve - a Newly Discovered Astronomical Phenomenon", "New kind of aurora is not an aurora at all", "Aurora photographers find new night sky lights and call them Steve", "Amateur Sky-Watchers Discover Celestial Phenomenon, Name It 'Steve, "New atmospheric phenomenon named STEVE discovered by aurora watchers", "Meet Steve, a sky phenomenon coming into its own", "Meet 'Steve,' a Totally New Kind of Aurora", "Help NASA Study 'Steve,' a Newfound Aurora Type", "NASA Needs Your Help to Find Steve and Here's How", "New science in plain sight: Citizen scientists lead to the discovery of optical structure in the upper atmosphere", "Steve the odd 'aurora' revealed to be two sky shows in one", "Magnetospheric signatures of STEVE: Implication for the magnetospheric energy source and inter‐hemispheric conjugacy", "Scientists discover what powers celestial phenomenon STEVE", "Aurora Australis with bonus 'picket fence' wows southern lights chasers in Tasmania", "Aurora-chasing citizen scientists help discover a new feature of STEVE", Eric Donovan's presentation at 2017 ESA Earth Explorer Missions Science Meeting, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Steve_(atmospheric_phenomenon)&oldid=989863502, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 21 November 2020, at 13:26. Thank you for signing up to Live Science. Photo: Elfiehall via Wikimedia Commons, CC-BY-SA 4.0 In July of last year, there was a thin trail of purple light that was witnessed streaking across the sky in northern Canada. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to … The ionosphere consists of three sections within the mesosphere and thermosphere, labeled the D, E and F layers, according to the UCAR Center for Science Education. [22], The green emissions seem to be related to eddies in the supersonic flow of charged particles, similar to the eddies seen in a river, which move more slowly than the other water around them. According to a … "STEVE is caused by a 25 km (16 mi) wide ribbon of hot plasma at an altitude of 450 km (280 mi), with a temperature of 3,000 °C (3,270 K; 5,430 °F) and flowing at a speed of 6 km/s (3.7 mi/s) (compared to 10 m/s (33 ft/s) outside the ribbon)." New research into a strange atmospheric effect known as STEVE has failed to associate its enigmatic lights with aurora, pointing to the presence of an entirely new type of atmospheric phenomenon. Amateur Skywatchers Spot New Atmospheric Phenomenon Its name is Steve, and it’s more common than you might think. While looking like a family … Writing in the journal Science Advances in March, researchers (including Gallardo-Lacourt) decided to keep the name "Steve" as the official nomenclature for the colorful happening, but they changed it to an acronym standing for "Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement" — aka STEVE. The name for this new atmospheric phenomenon is known by the acronym “STEVE,” which stands for: Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement. This photograph of STEVE was taken on May 8, 2016, in Keller, WA, the United States. Apr. What causes these ghostly lights is still a … For their new study, the team combined images taken by a network of ground-based cameras with data collected from one of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites, which were equipped with instruments capable of detecting charged particles descending through Earth's atmosphere. This amateur astronomer's photograph, taken on May 8, 2016, in Keller, Washington, was used in the new research about the celestial phenomenon called STEVE. ", "Our main conclusion is that STEVE is not an aurora," lead study author Bea Gallardo-Lacourt, a space physicist at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, said in a statement. The mysterious ribbon of atmospheric light known as STEVE slashes through the sky over British Columbia, Canada, on April 10, 2018. [14], STEVE may be spotted closer to the equator than the aurora,[15] and as of March 2018 has been observed in the United Kingdom, Canada, Alaska, northern U.S. states, and New Zealand. Find Northern Lights Atmospheric Phenomenon Steve Which stock images in HD and millions of other royalty-free stock photos, illustrations and vectors in the Shutterstock collection. Extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-rays from the sun bombard these upper regions of t… The mysterious ribbon of atmospheric light known as STEVE slashes through the sky over British Columbia, Canada, on April 10, 2018. "So right now, we know very little about it. In late 2016, the backronym "Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement" was adopted. Apr 24, 2017, 2:07 pm A bunch of citizen scientists and aurora photographers in Canada have discovered an atmospheric phenomenon that scientists know little about. You will receive a verification email shortly. Stevie (given name) List of people with given name Stephen; This page or section lists people that share the same given name. STEVE marks the first observed visual effect accompanying a SAID. Aurora photographers find new night sky lights and call them Steve - BBC News Quote: A group of aurora enthusiasts have found a new type of light in the night sky and named it Steve. Photo: Elfiehall via Wikimedia Commons, CC-BY-SA 4.0 In July of last year, there was a thin trail of purple light that was witnessed streaking across the sky in northern Canada. 24 APRIL 2017. In the new University of Calgary study, Gallardo-Lacourt and her colleagues decided to use the data recorded that night to further investigate Steve's mysterious origins. This is not a CAUSE, ...it is merely a description. “I don't think this story would have had the legs it has if we'd given it a more scientific name,” confesses Chris Ratzlaff. Ratzlaff was referring to an atmospheric optical phenomenon that appears as reddish and green light in the sky. A light pillar is an atmospheric optical phenomenon, which is caused by the reflection of light from ice crystals in cold weather. Meet Steve—a strange … The green bars in the picket fence are moving more slowly than the structures in the purple emissions, and some scientists have speculated they could be caused by turbulence in the charged particles from space. When a European Space Agency satellite passed directly through Steve in July 2016, instruments on board confirmed that a pipeline of incredibly fast, ridiculously hot gas was slicing through the atmosphere there. For now, the mysterious atmospheric phenomenon will continue to be known as Steve, until Eric Donovan and his colleagues come up with a better name, along with an explanation, which they are working on. Live Science is part of Future US Inc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. The aurora enthusiasts have named it Steve. Steve is an atmospheric optical phenomenon which appears as a purple and green light ribbon in the sky, formally discovered in late 2016 by aurora watchers from Alberta, Canada. The beautiful atmospheric phenomenon “Steve” was first documented by a Facebook Group last year. The celestial phenomenon known as STEVE is likely caused by a combination of heating of charged particles in the atmosphere and energetic …